Skipper Russell of Seasonal Produce Farm in Waynesville, one of the farms featured in the Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project Local Food Guide, sells tomatoes, bell peppers, beans, romaine lettuce, basil, broccoli, potatoes, cucumbers and sweet corn to Ingles Markets and others. Photo courtesy of ASAP.

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Shared by the Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project on April 19:

ASHEVILLE —Over the last decade, Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project (ASAP) has spearheaded a Local Food Campaign to support those on a journey to reconnect with their food.

At the center of it all has been the Local Food Guide. Since 2002, nine editions and almost 1 million copies have been printed to help people get to know area farmers, find CSAs (Community Supported Agriculture farms), and easily seek out local food at grocery stores, tailgate markets, restaurants, and other businesses.

To celebrate the new 10th edition, as well as the growth of the local food movement in the Southern Appalachians over the years, ASAP is hosting a Local Food Guide release party. The event, to be held May 7 from 4-8 p.m. at Asheville’s Highland Brewing Company, is an opportunity to pick up the 2011 guide hot off the press, enjoy giveaways and music by local act Uncle Mountain, and kick off the growing season with other local food enthusiasts.

Of course, what would a local food guide party be without local food—washed down with local brews? Tupelo Honey Cafe will be on hand to prepare farm-fresh bites, as well as sell their new cookbook, “Tupelo Honey Cafe: Spirited Recipes from Asheville’s New South Kitchen,” with sales to benefit ASAP.

“Ten years ago when we printed the first Local Food Guide, we could not have imagined how much could change in a decade,” said Charlie Jackson, ASAP’s director. “Today, the guide is the most comprehensive source for local food in the country, and the Appalachian region leads a national local food movement that is reshaping our farms and the way we eat.”

ASAP’s Local Food Guide release party is free and open to the public at Highland Brewing Company’s new Tasting Room at 12 Old Charlotte Highway, Suite H in Asheville. For more information, visit www.asapconnections.org/lfgparty.html. Those unable to attend can browse the 2011 10th edition online at http://buyappalachian.org/. Biltmore and Greenlife Grocery are the guide’s major sponsors.

ASAP’s mission is to help local farms thrive, link farmers to markets and supporters, and build healthy communities through connections to local food. To learn more about ASAP’s work, visit www.asapconnections.org/or call (828) 236-1282.




Kathleen O. Davis
Assistant Editor
Carolina Public Press
P.O. Box 17595, Asheville, N.C., 28816
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Kathleen O'Nan

Kathleen O'Nan is a contributing reporter to Carolina Public Press.

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