Avery Steimel, left, and Megan Cattrell laugh with volunteers from the Madison County Democratic Party as they hand out information to voters at Mars Hill Elementary on Tuesday. Colby Rabon / Carolina Public Press

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North Carolina voters turned out early in massive numbers compared with the early voting turnout for the last midterm elections in 2014, according to the state Board of Elections and Ethics Enforcement.

The state elections agency released data over the weekend providing a detailed breakdown of how many people have voted in each county. Statewide, 2.04 million out of 7.09 million registered voters have cast ballots so far, about 28.8 percent.

Unlike 2016, few statewide candidate contests are on the ballot this year, with only a few races for state Supreme Court and Court of Appeals seats appearing on all ballots. All voters will decide on General Assembly and congressional races, but not all of these races are contested, and not all of those are considered competitive.

North Carolina voters do face decisions on six proposed constitutional amendments on topics ranging from voter ID to hunting rights. These may be playing a role in driving turnout.

Some voters may be concerned about the direction of national politics and planning to make their positions known with votes for Congress and the political party of their choice in state and local contests. Some may be motivated by the direction of state government.

Some of the most fiercely competitive races this year will be county- or district-level contests for sheriffs, judges, county commissioners, clerks of court, registers of deeds, school boards and some other local offices.

Following is a look at each county. Early voting totals include all types of absentee ballots, including mail-ins and one-stop voters. One-stop voting ended midday Saturday. Mail-in votes continue to arrive at elections offices, so totals will go up in coming days.

Early voting numbers

Alamance: 31,517 early voters of 103,140 registered voters, 30.6 percent

Alexander: 8,411 of 24,547, 34.3 percent

Alleghany: 2,999 of 7,473, 40.1 percent

Anson: 3,812 of 17,415, 21.9 percent

Ashe: 5,827 of 19,285, 30.2 percent

Avery: 2,010 of 12,056, 16.7 percent

Beaufort: 10,490 of 33,563, 31.3 percent

Bertie: 2,901 of 14,217, 20.4 percent

Bladen: 7,084 of 23,276, 30.4 percent

Brunswick: 45,418 of 103,161, 44 percent

Buncombe: 80,109 of 198,739, 40.3 percent

Burke: 17,179 of 58,593, 29.3 percent

Cabarrus: 34,834 of 138,296, 25.2 percent

Caldwell: 16,040 of 55,001, 29.2 percent

Camden: 2,099 of 7,900, 26.6 percent

Carteret: 15,244 of 53,167, 28.7 percent

Caswell: 3,988 of 15,764, 25.3 percent

Catawba: 31,037 of 105,593, 29.4 percent

Chatham: 24,229 of 54,127, 44.8 percent

Cherokee: 5,354 of 23,450, 22.8 percent

Chowan: 3,266 of 10,340, 31.6 percent

Clay: 3,142 of 8,700, 36.1 percent

Cleveland: 17,973 of 64,929, 27.7 percent

Columbus: 8,571 of 37,772, 22.7 percent

Craven: 19,880 of 70,175, 28.3 percent

Cumberland: 48,494 of 220,183, 22.0 percent

Currituck: 3,200 of 20,056, 15.6 percent

Dare: 8,620 of 30,306, 28.4 percent

Davidson: 30,557 of 109,079, 28.0 percent

Davie: 9,142 of 29,924, 30.6 percent

Duplin: 6,201 of 30,427, 20.4 percent

Durham: 82,468 of 230,991, 35.7 percent

Edgecombe: 9,544 of 38,493, 24.8 percent

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Forsyth: 78,657 of 262,445, 30.0 percent

Franklin: 14,839 of 44,875, 33.1 percent

Gaston: 38,699 of 145,747, 26.6 percent

Gates: 1,525 of 8,777, 17.4 percent

Graham: 2,155 of 6,440, 33.5 percent

Granville: 12,752 of 39,174, 32.6 percent

Greene: 3,306 of 11,539, 28.7 percent

Guilford: 104,490 of 377,331, 27.7 percent

Halifax: 5,519 of 39,020, 14.1 percent

Harnett: 20,268 of 76,439, 26.5 percent

Haywood: 14,729 of 45,042, 37.0 percent

Henderson: 27,035 of 85,919, 31.5 percent

Hertford: 2,862 of 15,564, 18.4 percent

Hoke: 7,607 of 33,089, 23.0 percent

Hyde: 493 of 3,423, 14.4 percent

Iredell: 34,965 of 121,534, 28.8 percent

Jackson: 9,552 of 29,241, 32.7 percent

Johnston: 32,292 of 128,752, 25.1 percent

Jones: 1,553 of 7,327, 21.2 percent

Lee: 12,814 of 36,979, 34.7 percent

Lenoir: 12,469 of 38,758, 32.2 percent

Lincoln: 16,303 of 58,275, 28.0 percent

Macon: 9,252 of 26,342, 35.1 percent

Madison: 5,644 of 17,273, 32.7 percent

Martin: 3,933 of 17,089, 23.0 percent

McDowell: 7,724 of 29,644, 26.1 percent

Mecklenburg: 208,662 of 742,458, 28.1 percent

Mitchell: 3,854 of 11,116, 34.7 percent

Montgomery: 3,796 of 16,654, 22.8 percent

Moore: 20,300 of 68,492, 29.6 percent

Nash: 20,747 of 67,224, 30.9 percent

New Hanover: 54,616 of 172,320, 31.7 percent

Northamption: 2,751 of 14,605, 18.8 percent

Onslow: 15,365 of 109,476, 14.0 percent

Orange: 43,674 of 114,878, 38.0 percent

Pamlico: 2,966 of 9,778, 30.3 percent

Pasquotank: 8,547 of 29,288, 29.2 percent

Pender: 12,737 of 41,735, 30.5 percent

Perquimans: 3,109 of 10,157, 30.6 percent

Person: 8,046 of 26,909, 29.9 percent

Pitt: 33,164 of 124,886, 26.6 percent

Polk: 5,788 of 16,170, 35.8 percent

Randolph: 26,946 of 92,336, 29.2 percent

Richmond: 6,908 of 30,466, 22.7 percent

Robeson: 13,974 of 77,304, 18.1 percent

Rockingham: 18,709 of 60,560, 30.9 percent

Rowan: 23,591 of 95,949, 24.6 percent

Rutherford: 11,524 of 45,342, 25.4 percent

Sampson: 8,563 of 38,401, 22.3 percent

Scotland: 6,508 of 22,928, 28.4 percent

Stanly: 9,578 of 41,871, 22.9 percent

Stokes: 7,806 of 31,350, 24.9 percent

Surry: 12,586 of 46,066, 27.3 percent

Swain: 3,335 of 10,438, 32.9 percent

Transylvania: 9,991 of 26,181, 38.2 percent

Tyrrell: 614 of 2,420, 25.4 percent

Union: 51,075 of 157,263, 32.5 percent

Vance: 8,577 of 30,342, 28.3 percent

Wake: 212,445 of 741,286, 28.7 percent

Warren: 3,681 of 13,612, 27.0 percent

Washington: 2,467 of 8,813, 28.0 percent

Watauga: 15,766 of 47,596, 33.1 percent

Wayne: 22,637 of 75,689, 29.9 percent

Wilkes: 9,310 of 43,058, 21.6 percent

Wilson: 15,793 of 56,690, 27.9 percent

Yadkin: 4,236 of 24,214, 17.5 percent

Yancey: 6,007 of 14,322, 41.9 percent


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Frank Taylor

Frank Taylor is the managing editor of Carolina Public Press. Contact him at ftaylor@carolinapublicpress.org.

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